Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
October 23, 2014, 05:09:42 AM
Home Search Search Login Register

+  Pet Goldfish - Aquarium Forum Community
|-+  Aquarium
| |-+  General Goldfish Discussion
| | |-+  Can Someone Tell Me What Kind Of Goldfish These Are?
« previous next »
Pages: [1]
Author Topic: Can Someone Tell Me What Kind Of Goldfish These Are?  (Read 1274 times)
dlong51
Newbie
*

Karma: 0
Posts: 1


Can Someone Tell Me What Kind Of Goldfish These Are?
« on: December 30, 2009, 03:52:05 PM »

Can anyone tell me what type of goldfish these are.  They were given to me and were raised in a whiskey barrel that was cut in half and fiberglassed. (app. 30 gallons)  I moved them into a 250 gallon tank that is filtered and aireated.  They have been in this tank for a couple of months and have done very well.  I am worried about the water temperature because I can't find a heater big enough to work on this size of tank.  It is on my front porch and is covered but still out in the open to the atomospheric elements.  I live south of Houston, TX and the temp doesn't normally freeze but the water temp has gotten as low as 46 F.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2009, 04:59:23 PM by dlong51 » Logged
Sami
Guest
Re: Can Someone Tell Me What Kind Of Goldfish These Are?
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2009, 06:18:10 PM »

hmmm, they look like they could be either calico fantails or ryukins. Ryukins have humps like camels whereas fantails do not. Both of these varieties are pretty hardy . As far as heating the tank, i have a smaller 75 gallon tank and i use two smaller heaters instead of just one, which allow for better heat distribution throughout the tank. I set them to kick in if the temperatures drop below a certain point. Maybe you can do something similar in your larger tank.
Logged
Fleabie
Newbie
*

Karma: 0
Posts: 26


Re: Can Someone Tell Me What Kind Of Goldfish These Are?
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2010, 08:25:51 AM »

Goldfish like Fantails and Ryukins can survive pretty low temperatures. They've been known to survive in iced-over ponds, as long as there is a hole in the ice to allow the water to breathe. In colder temperatures, they will sit quietly on the bottom of the tub and not eat a lot. It's a form of hibernation. Don't feed them a lot when it's cold, as the food won't be eaten and will just spoil the water.

My pond reaches temps of about 5 degrees celsius in winter. The fish become slow and sluggish and stop eating. When the weather warms up in spring, they become more active and start to swim around. (The pond reaches about 25 degrees on a hot day in mid summer, just shows how wide a range of temperatures goldfish can withstand.)

I had a tub pond with two small comets. To keep it warm, I placed potted plants around the tub, which sheltered the water surface from cold winds and insulated the tub. I placed a light above the tub, and this seemed to warm the water considerably. The light created a fertile breeding ground for algae, though, so I had to put more plants into the tub. I think the new plants, along with the light, helped to keep it warm in there.
Logged
Pages: [1]  
« previous next »
Jump to:  
Page created in 0.161 seconds with 16 queries.