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Author Topic: tank size and possible ammonia poisoning  (Read 613 times)
fuwball
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tank size and possible ammonia poisoning
« on: October 01, 2012, 08:29:58 PM »

ok so daughter wanted to get her first fish.. bought her a 1 gallon glass tank, got tank buddy dechlorinating tabs, got water to room temp, bought a gold fish, put him in...   food said to give twice a day and i have limited her to feeding very small amounts each time.  today she noticed a couple brown spots on fishies side and changing along the edge of his fins..

can this be corrected?  I am seeing on some sites that the tank just may not be big enough, but if i change some of the water and cut the food back to once a day can we get him healthy again so she doesn't loose her new fish in the first week?
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scrivens345
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Re: tank size and possible ammonia poisoning
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2012, 02:28:06 AM »

You need to get a much bigger tank with adequate filtration. Here is a guide to tank requirements(Link is not visible to guests. Please register to view.)

A 2-year old common goldfish can easily be  8 inches long, so you should be looking at tanks of 40 to 50 gallons; If that is not possible, you should consider returning the fish to the store.

Virtually anything would be better than a 1 gallon tank; as an emergency measure a large plastic storage box could be used to re-home the fish

In the mean time change 75% of the water every day and add a filter.
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fuwball
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Re: tank size and possible ammonia poisoning
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2012, 08:01:18 AM »

should we use the tabs that remove the chlorine and such with the water changes? back when i was little we had a 20 gallon tank or so and a filtration system so i'm on new ground here
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scrivens345
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Re: tank size and possible ammonia poisoning
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2012, 01:09:41 PM »

Always use a water-conditioner.
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Vicloz2006
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Re: tank size and possible ammonia poisoning
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2012, 02:38:14 PM »

Well you defo need a bigger tank, always use water conditioner. Does the tank have a filter? How big is the fish? The only thing that will honestly make the fish any better is a bigger tank.
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fuwball
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Re: tank size and possible ammonia poisoning
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2012, 07:16:26 PM »

ok, tank is 1 gallon, no filter no oxygenator thingie.. fish is about an inch long... changed water completely and added the water-conditioner.. we are in search of a bigger tank.  hopefully freecycle will have something, craigslist didn't Sad
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fuwball
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Re: tank size and possible ammonia poisoning
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2012, 11:00:35 PM »

alright, looks like we found her a ten gallon tank... so do you guys recommend the air rocks, or an electric air thing?  is there a brand of filter that works best? When I set up the tank how long should i leave it before adding in the fish?  I know, alot of questions, but if I can keep this fish alive for her to enjoy then that will be awesome..
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Skwishee
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Re: tank size and possible ammonia poisoning
« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2012, 02:15:51 AM »

Hi Fuwball and welcome to the forum,

It's terrific that you've gotten a bigger tank, 10 gallons is faaar better than a 1 gallon tanks but please keep in mind, you will more than likely have to upgrade once the fish has grown Smiley

Common goldfish can and will grow up to 1 foot (sometimes more) when given proper care, usually they are kept in ponds, so when a common goldfish reaches around 5 or 6 inches, that's *from what I've read* the best size to move them at. Or alternatively you can keep them in really large tanks of 6 foot in length (or more). They need lots of space purely for growth, exercise and good health  Smiley

I completely understand your situation though, as I'm in a similar predicament. I previously had my goldfish Lucky in a 5 gallon tank and when I learnt of my mistake upgraded her to a 23 gallon tank/3 foot in length. I will be upgrading her to a pond much later as she's a bit of a runt and is slightly stunted from being kept in her small 5 gallon tank for so long, so she grows real slow, it's taken her most of this year to grow half an inch Roll Eyes

Just wanted to share that so you don't feel alone we all make these mistakes Wink

Okay now as for your questions;
Air stones; Theses are mainly used for circulation in a tank, now normally if your filter is good enough it will provide enough circulation for you and you won't need it, however in some cases it might not and these guys become useful in those situations. For example my filters output is rather strong, so my spray bar faces the back of the tank to create less current, but at the same time this doesn't do much for the circulation, so I have air stones in my tank. They are also used for decoration too. But they are not necessary pieces of equipment!

Filters; For goldfish, I would suggest an external filter, they are much bigger than any internal filter and as a result it means more filter media = more bacteria can grow (bacteria in the filter will deal with the ammonia/nitrite in the water).
Depending on where in the world you are... I've been using a filter made by a company called All Pond Solutions, but I believe in America it is called Aquatop (basically one company somewhere makes them, various companies sell them).
They look like this;
[image]


They are the cheapest brand of external filter I've seen in the UK and they can come with a built in UV bulb.
I made a review of mine, so be sure to take a look - (Link is not visible to guests. Please register to view.) and of course do your own research as to what your budget can manage and what filter you'd prefer  Smiley There are a lot of options out there.

With regards to setting up the tank, I would suggest you grab a liquid test kit (not the strip tests, liquid will last much longer and is much more economical  Wink I've had my liquid test for over a year now). This will help you know when the tank is cycled. Now I would go into more detail but I have some training to be at, so when I get back I shall explain more about fishless cycling, unless one of the others beats me to it Wink

Fish-in cycle could be a possibility here, given the circumstances, but I'd like to see what the others think of that idea before suggesting it!

Oh and also, welcome to the world of fishkeeping  Grin
« Last Edit: October 03, 2012, 02:18:34 AM by Skwishee » Logged
scrivens345
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Re: tank size and possible ammonia poisoning
« Reply #8 on: October 03, 2012, 05:44:55 AM »

I would opt for something like a Hagan U2 filter, it is a 3-stage filter and would also cope with a tank upgrade.(Link is not visible to guests. Please register to view.)

Please bear in mind that you will need to upgrade your tank within 6-months

A 25 gallon tank would give about a year's service before the fish gets too large. Keep your eyes peeled for a Dollar per gallon sale at a discount store and get the largest tank you can afford

I would go for a "fish in cycle", as your fish is not going to survive in the 1 gallon for too long

During the cycle I should reccomend that you change 50% of the water every second day.
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