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Author Topic: New to fish  (Read 936 times)
ASHViN
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New to fish
« on: December 07, 2011, 10:09:29 AM »

Hello!
Please help me identify my goldfish..
I read a bit about them but I cant differentiate if my white/red goldfish is an Oranda or a fantail..??
The two goldfish that I have seems to have double tail but the red one's tail is linked together with a third tail..
We all love them at home and I would like know their species so as I can take more specific care about them..

Please also suggest me what other species of goldfish or other fish I can put in the same aquarium later?

Is it important to have the species in at least a pair?

Thanks!
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Nossie
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Re: New to fish
« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2011, 11:51:58 AM »

Fantails, all of them Smiley Orandas would have a prominent head growth, and these don't.
And the goldfish are one species, carassius auratus, your concern would be keeping the correct varieties together. Generally, only twin-tailed goldfish will go together and the single-tailed should be kept together Smiley
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Skwishee
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Re: New to fish
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2011, 05:40:49 PM »

Wow, I never realised two fantails could look so.... different?

I thought the first one was a comet with a double tail XD It looks a little slimmer than the white one from above and I read about commons/comets with split tails being possible somewhere. But looking at them, I see the 'egg shape' not a slim body.
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ASHViN
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Re: New to fish
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2011, 08:19:42 PM »

Thank you Nossie and Skwishee..  Smiley

So both of them are fantail..

However the red one has 3 tails and the white 1 has a double tail slightly split.. You may notice that in the previous picture seen from above..

I will go for double tail goldfish only if I add more fish in the aquarium.. I wont add other species of fish, as suggested by Nossie. Infact it is true that single tail and double tail will compete for food. However I wanted put some other species of fish too.. Maybe I should learn to handle these first, then later we see others..  Wink

Indeed the red one is smaller than the white. Can we know their age according to their size?

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Skwishee
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Re: New to fish
« Reply #4 on: December 08, 2011, 05:44:57 AM »

There is a goldfish growth chart -

[image]


I wouldn't say it's entirely accurate, as I imagine individual growth rates of goldfish will vary, so some may grow faster or slower than others and it also wouldn't be helpful if a goldfish was kept in a too small aquarium and it's growth was stunted. But it could help give you a rough idea of their age Smiley
For example when I first got my goldfish, she was only around 2 inches, but in the space of 3 months, she's grown to 3 inches! Whereas the chart says this amount of growth takes 6 months  Wink

As for competing for food, fancy varieties of goldfish, such as the fantail, tend to be slower moving when compared to the single tailed goldfish like the comet/common which are fairly fast. So yes they'll compete for food, but the reason they're not advised to be kept together is due to the issue that the faster moving single tailed goldfish will eat more (if not all) of the food, before the fancy has a chance. So it is best to keep faster and slower varieties separate.

Also what size is your current tank? By knowing the size of the tank, you can work out the stocking levels.
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Nossie
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Re: New to fish
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2011, 10:56:10 AM »

You should generally not try to keep any other species of fish with goldfish. If you mean other varieties of fancy goldfish, be my guest, as long as you can keep 10 gallons per fish, these three shouldn't be in anything smaller than a 30 gallon Smiley
It would be easier for others to understand exactly what you mean if you'd talk about varieties and kinds rather than species, since there really only is one species of goldfish Smiley Think about dogs, do you call a border collie a separate species or is it still a dog? Wink

Skwishee: They can be SO different! Cheesy I have a few fantails, all with different types of bodies and tails Smiley Some have very deep bodies and big tails, (Freya and Samantha) while others are slimmer with pretty stiff tails (Cream and Honey) and Samurai with kind of slim body, almost like a chubby common and a small, twin tail Smiley Of course, they're not really a part of the show standards, but it's very charming Smiley
« Last Edit: December 08, 2011, 11:09:11 AM by Nossie » Logged
scrivens345
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Re: New to fish
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2011, 11:01:21 AM »

You still have to be careful with mixing fancies, as Ryukins are well known to pick on moors for example
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ASHViN
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Re: New to fish
« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2011, 11:08:43 PM »

Thanks for the chart Skwishee..  Smiley
Now I get a rought idea about the age of my fish.. (zey'r both less than 6cm long from tail tip to mouth,so its makes around 6 month old)

My aquarium tank is small.. Sad (36cmx36cmx36cm And it makes about 12 gal/45 lt)

I agree wiz Skwishee and Nossie that we shd keep 10 gal per fish..I think its due to the fact that the fish will grow in size and need more space but although my aquarium small, I see lot of space in it for the time being (please see the photos below)

Nevertheless I'll build another larger aquarium later.

Sorry  for the misunderstanding about species of goldfish Nossie, I should had said VARIETIES of goldfish instead..Your example of dog cool!  Cool

Thanks once again for the information on what fish to add to the aquarium.

I think scrivens345 is right to say that I should be careful although mixing fancies.. I read a bit and Moors and Telescope Eyes have poorer vision, so its good not to mix 'more active' fish goldfish varieties.

For the food I bought floating pellets as suggested by the sales person at the petshop.. (see my third picture below)
I feed both with about 12 small red pellets ball two times a day; 7:00 AM & 19:00 PM.. However, they seem always hungry!  Cheesy they eat all the pellets as soon I they are fed!  Grin

I hope I am feed them the way they should be...? Huh

I read that some goldfish live even more than 10 years and I wish I keep them healthy enough to see them grow throughout the years...

Thanks for all the tips provided here! I do not know who all of you are but I think that if you can love a fish, then you should be a nice caring loving person who have patience and devotes to other aspects of life.. So thanks once again!  Kiss
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Skwishee
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Re: New to fish
« Reply #8 on: December 09, 2011, 04:51:00 AM »

Yes it is true, Goldfish can live 10 to 15 years or more, I think one of the oldest goldfish was around 44!

Floating pellets will be fine and goldfish will always act hungry Wink
There are other foods you can feed them, such as freeze dried and frozen products which come in a variety of flavours such as tubifex worms, blood worms, daphnia, krill, shrimp etc. You can also feed goldfish some fruits and vegetables, but quite often it's down to their personal tastes as to which ones they'll eat!
We have a thread here on the forums, which is a guide to feeding vegetables - (Link is not visible to guests. Please register to view.)

While I can appreciate your goldfish are only around 2 inches at the moment, they will need a larger aquarium soon. As I mentioned previously my goldfish Lucky grew an inch in just 3 months!
One of the main reasons it is recommended to have 10 gallons per fish, is not only because of the growth, but also because of the amount of waste goldfish produce, so the more water they have, the better as it makes the waste less concentrated and less harmful to the fish. Otherwise if the tank space is too small and/or the tank has too many fish, the water will become toxic and will either make the fish very ill or kill them.

Actually that's just made me realise, did you cycle your tank?
When a tank cycles, it goes through the nitrogen cycle (there are several threads around here that explain it very well, so I'll just do a brief summary).
So to begin with Ammonia levels will rise and spike, bacteria will be developing which transform Ammonia into Nitrites, then Ammonia levels will go down and Nitrites will spike up, then more bacteria will develop turning Nitrites into Nitrates.
Ammonia is deadly to fish and Nitrites are pretty bad for them as well, but Nitrates are okay in a low concentration.

So as fish keepers, we either have a water testing kit at home or we take our water sample to a local pet shop.
This will then tell us what the Ammonia, Nitrite and Nitrate levels are in the tank. So in a fully cycled tank Ammonia will be 0ppm, Nitrite will be 0ppm and Nitrates will ideally be below 40ppm (ppm stands for parts per million, it's how things are measured in aquaria).

With the photos, I believe your log ornament is like an air stone? So am I right in thinking you currently don't have a filter? How often are you doing water changes at the moment and when you do a water change, do you use a water conditioner?
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Nossie
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Re: New to fish
« Reply #9 on: December 09, 2011, 05:01:50 AM »

You seriously need to look into a big tank. If you can build it yourself, start right now Smiley
I started with my fish in a 30 liter tank, some of the ones from that tank never grew and died quite recently. I kept them in the small tanks (split them up into a 40 and the 30 liter), and upgraded into a 317 liter after a year, two of these fish were stunted and died after a year in the large tank. The ones I have left from that time are still growing a lot slower than my newer additions, sadly. But they seem very grateful for the extra space Smiley If you happen to like these fish of yours a lot, don't risk losing them early on!
These two need at least 20 gallons, but I'd get them a 25-30 gallon for that extra luxury and safety Wink
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