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Author Topic: salt  (Read 944 times)
Summer Time
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salt
« on: July 14, 2010, 09:02:11 PM »

I have had goldfish in the past, that I had for 5 years (until my neighbors kid picked them up and was 'petting' them).  But I am new to having a 'cycled' tank.  I used to just dump and scrub the tank every month, but am trying to do it this way now.  My tank is cycled, and the water is in very good condition.  Is aquarium salt required for goldfish?  I have never used it before, and am reading conflicting advice on it's use.  Thanks Smiley
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Andrea
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Re: salt
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2010, 03:10:31 AM »

Good to hear you have learnt about cycling, that is pretty much what I also use to do until I learnt about it and believe I have a much healthier and happier fish Smiley

Aquarium salt can be used when your fish has some sort of infection like fin rot etc. But if there is nothing wrong with your fish then I believe there is no reason to use it as goldfish are fresh water fish. I've heard about people doing salt dips every so often. However, I would just leave to this to more experienced fish owners and maybe ones that have communities tanks. It's not necessary.
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Nossie
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Re: salt
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2010, 04:38:27 AM »

Andrea's right, you shouldn't be adding salt without a reason. Because goldfish are freshwater fish, and they're not suited for marine or brackish water Wink It'd probably just bring excess stress to keep a goldfish in a salt solution for too long.

Hope you also replaced the monthly scrubbing with weekly water changes Grin
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Summer Time
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Re: salt
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2010, 09:55:11 PM »

Hi,

Thanks for your posts.  You are all so kind and helpful.  It's great to talk to some persons who have actual, real experience.  Even tho different parts of the world have different types of bacteria in their tap water, I'm guessing most of the same advice would apply to most people/fish.

I do weekly water changes, and test the water every time, and am pleased to say it has been doing very well.  I started cycling last March, so it has been going well for a while now. 

I have been doing a lot of research since March, learning as much as I can about cycling, and goldfish, and now I guess I have to read more about diseases, although I really don't want to, yuck.

I'm a little worried about the Melafix that I just put in (which I used for 3 days), and I put in 1 dose of Pimafix, and 1/2 Tablespoon of aquarium salt for my sick fish, who has recently passed.  These medications claim that they don't mess up the biological filter.  Since the medication, I have done one large water change of 25%.  I have also returned the carbon back to my filter.

I want to bring my tank back to a salt-free environment.  I guess this will eventually happen with my weekly water changes.  Unless I should do it more quickly.

I've considered changing 1/10th the water every 2-3 days to get rid of the salt more quickly, but I am not sure how critical this is.  Unless I hear differently, I am planning to stay with my weekly water changes.

Should I try to remove the salt a.s.a.p.?  Or is a gradual reduction better?
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Nossie
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Re: salt
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2010, 03:19:03 AM »

There's no need to hurry with removing the salt or these medications since they are all natural remedies and they're not hurting the fish Smiley So, if your tank is cycled, just keep doing your weekly water changes Wink And make them around a third of the tank capacity. It's also advisable to test the water before your water changes, and let the levels of nitrates decide for you if you change 25% or 50% Cheesy The salt will be gone in no time Wink

Tell me, how are the readings of ammonia and nitrite in your tank? Smiley
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Andrea
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Re: salt
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2010, 06:02:03 AM »

Shouldn't the carbon remove the salt? Oh wait maybe not because I guess they use carbon in saltwater aquariums and that would be a bit of disaster if that's what it did!

But Nossie has it right, it won't cause any major harm. I imagine most of it is gone anyway. If your tank is all cycled and tests come back positive well then I'd say it is ready for a fish.
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Summer Time
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Re: salt
« Reply #6 on: July 16, 2010, 09:35:57 PM »

I'm so glad that I don't have to worry about the salt.  My readings of ammonia and nitrite are 0.  Usually I change only about 15-20% a week, and my readings stay at good levels.
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Hanna
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Re: salt
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2010, 04:25:16 AM »

Salt will not cause major harm as Nossie said and as Andrea confirmed. So do I. Wink Keep doing your normal waterchanges, so the tank stays cycled. You're doing well. Also you must not be worried about using Melafix and Pimafix as they are natural remedies.
All is fine..  Wink
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Summer Time
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Re: salt
« Reply #8 on: July 19, 2010, 06:43:48 PM »

Regarding Nossie's comment about water changes, she mentioned that I should test the water BEFORE doing a water change to determine how much to change.  That makes sense, but I was testing it afterwards, because that way you get more true test results, rather than just from the top of the tank.

Can you explain this more to me, because I can see that if I continue to do standard 15% water changes, my nitrate levels will steadily increase.  But I don't want to make the water changes too large because I don't want to wash away my friendly bugs. 

You mentioned 25-50%, but that sounds so high.
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Nossie
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Re: salt
« Reply #9 on: July 20, 2010, 05:36:27 AM »

You get LESS true results if you test it after the water change. Because you have added new water, so the possible nitrate results may be less alarming than they should. Besides, the water in the tank, is allover the tank, and not just on the surface d:

Anyway, 50% water change is completely safe in a cycled tank (ammonia and nitrites= 0), because all the beneficial bacteria grow on the filter media inside your pump/filter and in the gravel Smiley And don't be afraid to clean the gravel, because that's where all the leftovers go! And that's where most of the nitrates are building up.
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Summer Time
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Re: salt
« Reply #10 on: July 20, 2010, 10:49:00 PM »

I should have been more clear.  I test the water that I've removed from the tank, while it's still in the bucket, before I dump the bucket.

Thanks for explaining where the beneficial bacteria lives.  I've noticed that my nitrates are steadily increasing, although they're still in the 'safe' range', around 10-15.  So maybe I need to do larger water changes every once in a while.


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Nossie
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Re: salt
« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2010, 04:26:01 AM »

That's another way to do it in that case d:

Do you regularly clean the gravel? That's where all the dirt and leftovers of food are, and these may be the reason your nitrates are increasing Smiley
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Summer Time
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Re: salt
« Reply #12 on: July 21, 2010, 08:29:57 PM »

I do clean between the stones.  I don't have gravel, I have those smooth oval glass stones at the bottom, about 1" long and 1/2" wide and 1/4" tall.
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Nossie
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Re: salt
« Reply #13 on: July 22, 2010, 03:41:01 AM »

Okay, that's good Smiley
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