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Author Topic: Tank Problem  (Read 934 times)
newbiefishgirl
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Tank Problem
« on: April 10, 2011, 02:27:48 PM »

Hi, I am new to taking care of fish and unfortunately was allowed to leave the pet store with a 2 gallon tank for a Black Moor Goldfish which now has horrible pH/ammonia issues - I have treated it with everything I was told to and it is still high, I just got a 10 gallon for the Black Moor and just began cycling today - I am worried about leaving her in the 2 gallon and was wondering if I should move her into the 2 gallon sooner rather than later and if so how soon?
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fantailer
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Re: Tank Problem
« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2011, 03:57:58 PM »

Move it into the ten gallon in a day or so. Goldfish can survive cycling if you do water changes every 2 or 3 days.
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newbiefishgirl
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Re: Tank Problem
« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2011, 04:18:03 PM »

And the female Beta moving into the 2 gal with undergravel filter shouldn't be an issue right? No cycling really involved with them? As long as you treat the water with Beta treatment?
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newbiefishgirl
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Re: Tank Problem
« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2011, 04:23:42 PM »

I'll also move in the plant from the 2 gal to the 10 gal with the Black Moor so it'll help the bacteria grow faster, from what I've read (:
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fantailer
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Re: Tank Problem
« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2011, 04:29:08 PM »

I don't really think moving the betta will be a problem.
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newbiefishgirl
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Re: Tank Problem
« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2011, 04:40:03 PM »

Is introducing another female Beta in to the 2 gal easy/an issue at all?
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fantailer
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Re: Tank Problem
« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2011, 05:40:27 AM »

I think when you introduce another female betta to another you''ll need more room like 4 gal.
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Nossie
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Re: Tank Problem
« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2011, 03:42:55 PM »

I'd rather not cram two bettas into such a small space. Even if they're female, they may gt aggressive towards eachother.

The plant isn't going to help the tank cycle at all, just buy a test kit and keep an eye on the ammonia, nitrite and nitrate, and add lots of beneficial bacteria!!
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newbiefishgirl
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Re: Tank Problem
« Reply #8 on: April 14, 2011, 11:07:41 AM »

Thanks for all the advice!! I am taking it!!

The new 10 gal has been doing great but is now starting to get cloudy, any ideas?
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newbiefishgirl
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Re: Tank Problem
« Reply #9 on: April 14, 2011, 11:09:45 AM »

The pH is neutral but the nitrate and nitrite levels are a little high but not bad, should I just let it get cloudy for the cycle? It always makes me so sad when the water is cloudy, I've been doing 20% water changes every 2 days, I am not sure what else to do.
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Summer Time
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Re: Tank Problem
« Reply #10 on: April 14, 2011, 10:04:30 PM »

I've read that it will get cloudy during cycling, then clears up.
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newbiefishgirl
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Re: Tank Problem
« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2011, 03:08:47 PM »

The fish ate the beneficial bacteria I put in the tank, not all of it just some of it while it was at the top of the water floating...please tell me this is okay
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Nossie
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Re: Tank Problem
« Reply #12 on: April 20, 2011, 03:18:15 AM »

It's fine, they can't really eat the bacteria, it'll go out through their gills. Do you have an ammonia test?? That's the most toxic compound in your tank, so you need to know if that gets too high.
Could you please tell me EXACTLY:
How long have you cycled the tank by now?
How much/often do you feed the fish?
TEST RESULTS:
pH:
ammonia:
nitrite:
nitrate:
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newbiefishgirl
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Re: Tank Problem
« Reply #13 on: April 20, 2011, 03:20:06 PM »

I AM OFFICIALLY FREAKING OUT.

Levels have been fine all week, nitrate and nitrate were a little high but still in the "safe" rang - the tank was a little cloudy so I put in the amount of water clearer that it said to on the bottle and 20-30 minutes later I noticed that the fish was swimming gasping for air at the top of the tank and even could see the veins in his fins (or at least that's what it looked like). So I took him out and put him in the bowl that I had the water setting in for his water change tomorrow but he still wont eat. I am not sure what to do. HELP ME PLEASE, I am so scared for my fishy.
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newbiefishgirl
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Re: Tank Problem
« Reply #14 on: April 20, 2011, 05:37:34 PM »

Crisis handled. Fish is doing fine and I will be getting a better filter. That was frightening.
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Bel
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Re: Tank Problem
« Reply #15 on: April 21, 2011, 12:22:12 PM »

Its going to cloud up like that sometimes during cycling.  I would do a 50% water change or more every other day.  A 10g is still small for a goldfish and the ammonia/nitrite/nitrate during the cycle are going to build up much faster in the tank.  Honestly, what is recommended for goldfish is a minimal 20g tank for one fish and then add 10g more for each additional fish since they can get quite large.  A 10g is going to seem cramped when he is full grown but you have time to keep an eye out for a good deal on a bigger tank I would say.   I wouldn't add anything like meds or water treatments like that until the tank is fully cycled and free of ammonia.  Only thing I would add is PRIME, a water conditioner that neutralizes the ammonia/nitite for you and gets the clorine out of the tap water.  When cycling my tank I used Prime and it did wonders in keeping the fish safe and I never did get cloudy water either during it all.  Its recommended that goldfish have a filter that does 10x gph.  They can be quite nasty little guys and produce ALOT of waste.  After everything is cycled up then you can go down to 50% water change per week and rinse the filters only in tank water or treated water.  Tap water kills your beneficial bacteria unless its well water or something.   The ammonia is the most harmful for your fish so I would get a liquid test kit as soon as possible to keep and eye on that.  When cycling my tank I tried to keep the ammonia and nitrite at LESS than .50, ideally it stayed around .25 for the most part until it was completely cycled.  Hope all goes well for you!
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Summer Time
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Re: Tank Problem
« Reply #16 on: April 21, 2011, 01:08:15 PM »

Good advice, except well water still has chlorine in it.
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Nossie
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Re: Tank Problem
« Reply #17 on: May 03, 2011, 10:25:25 AM »

Don't remove the fish just because you're worried about the water quality! A simple water change will repair the problem Smiley Really, instead of freaking out, remove a couple of buckets of the dirty water. Which you definitely need to do, every week, and more often during cycling!!
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4inch oranda
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Re: Tank Problem
« Reply #18 on: May 26, 2011, 08:22:22 AM »

the more you move the fish the more stressed he is going to get. then you will have problems with him.
all tanks get cloudy during cycle. nothing to worry about.
your ammonia will get sky high, just do water changes and it should lower itself.
when you get readings for nitrate you are nearly there.
but dont move the fish again. that is asking for trouble
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